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Empowerment from Source Point Training

Having just completed watching the Winter Olympics in Seoul, Korea, we can learn so many lessons of leadership, commitment and excellence.  This international event brings all types of leaders together to compete; but more importantly, to show others what is possible with 100% commitment to win.  Winning requires us to be willing to fail many times.  This is often what separates true leaders from those who are interested in only creating results and focused on their egos.  In order to accept loosing at times, we must be willing to face higher challenges and open our minds to something new in order to learn how to become successful.

“High aims form high characters, and great objectives bring out greater minds,” Tryon Edwards wrote this statement in the middle of the 19th Century when the age of the industrial revolution was just beginning. As people began to see the value of automation to improve performance and quality of labor and commerce, more people began to open their minds to new possibilities in the way they did business and lived their lives each day. We remember this time in history when there was excitement and a belief that anyone could become successful with hard work and ingenuity.

What our world needs now is for everyone to see themselves as a leader and to  be willing to take risks and to challenge themselves to think outside of their box. Instead of being a journalist and talking about what change is needed, we must be willing to create the change we want. These are powerful words and many leaders in history have shared this thinking in many different ways. However, without taking action and  staying committed to the change we want, it is too easy to step back and wait for someone else to take the lead.

Here are 8 simple things anyone can do each day to demonstrate their leadership value.

  1. Take time to read something new and share what you’ve learned with someone else.
  2. Identify one thing you would like to change and take action each day to create that change. This could be something as simple as cleaning out your closet and donating what you don’t need to others.
  3. Acknowledge everyone you see each day – this could be as simple as giving them a smile.
  4. Make a donation of ANY value at least once a month to a cause that is important to you.
  5. Practice listening deeply when people are talking to you. Let them know you HEAR them by responding to what they say.
  6. Listen to your body to stay healthy and exercise regularly and eat healthy foods.
  7. Maintain the environment around you by following sustainable practices such as recycling or using water bottles.
  8. If you experience conflict around you, step in to make things better and resolve it.

Being a leader is a mindset and it involves your identity. When we see ourselves as leaders, we recognize our contribution and show up authentically; not because we want approval but because we believe we can make a difference. Each person who participated at this year’s Olympic games saw themselves as a leader and committed years of practice to become excellent and to inspire all of us to see what is possible when we are willing to risk and reach for the gold.

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

 

Connect Your Clients to Higher Purpose

We are always excited and eager to share what our coaches are up to!  Chris Taylor, a 2006 coach graduate, and her colleague Audrey Seymour, are offering a wonderful Zoom seminar and we encourage everyone to check it out!  Details below and more information is available at  http://truepurpose.net/wisdomsource

Imagine fulfilling your calling as part of a community dedicated to awakening the light of Divine Purpose in every soul, while at the same time meeting your financial needs through a thriving purposeful business.

If this is you, we invite you to join True Purpose® Institute trainers Audrey Seymour and Chris Taylor for a special no-fee Zoom seminar to:

  • Discuss what it means to have a purposeful business, the advantages of having one and the options available to you
  • Reconnect with your higher guidance live on the conference to clarify your most purposeful next steps
  • Connect with fellow change agents in like-minded community
  • Share the inspiration of your purpose with others
  • Learn whether the upcoming True Purpose® Coach Training is purposeful for you right now

Event: Purposeful Business: Connect Your Clients to Higher Purpose

Date: Thursday, January 18th, 2018

Time: 12 Noon Pacific Time / 3:00 pm Eastern Time / 8 pm GMT

 

Every Leader Has a Dream

Every leader has a dream – to contribute to others’ success, to inspire and to believe in new possibilities that others cannot yet see.

This week, we celebrate Martin Luther King Jr., a man that changed the way we believed, the way we talked and the way we behaved in order to provide human rights for ALL individuals regardless of the color of their skin or where they came from.  We remember him and his dream.

Today, we are challenged more than ever to uphold the beliefs and values he talked about, lived and instilled in so many during a very dark time in our history.   I am fortunate to have lived my life during this time.  A time of great change in the way people saw each other and the stand they were willing to take for freedom and human rights.  As a young girl, I was raised in California – the San Francisco Bay Area.   I did not see or experience prejudice the way many others across our country did at that time.  It wasn’t until I moved to Alabama in the mid 60’s that I began to realize for the first time the prejudice that Black Americans faced each day.   I was there when Bobby Kennedy was shot and killed in Los Angeles.

These were times that no one would have thought could have become so hateful and violent.  Martin Luther King Jr. gave us hope for a new day as he shared with us the power of his dream.  Today we might be reminded of his words when he shared.

As we begin this New Year, let us commit to remember this man’s dream.  That in the face of our social media networks, tweets and fake news, we all really know what is required in order to create a world that works for everyone.  That is love, understanding, a willingness to work together towards a shared vision and listening to understand all points of views in order to determine the best path.

The advent of instant messages creates a smaller world but does not need to create smaller thinking.  The gift of age means that we have experiences of our life and lessons we have learned.  Youth gives us opportunities to stretch and to grow and to explore.  My dream for 2018 is that together – all men and women young and old – come together with the energy and excitement to work together, to invent a future that will sustain our world and all its people.

“If you can’t fly then run, if you can’t run then walk,

if you can’t walk then crawl, but whatever you do

you have to keep moving forward.”

Martin Luther King Jr.

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

 

Finding Yourself Again!

Our friend and colleague, Bill Dean, has long stood for whole and healthy families in his work with troubled teens. Bill has written many insightful and thought-provoking articles that provide opportunities for reflection and new choices.  We are thrilled to share one of his articles with you and invite you to commit to finding your true, authentic self again.

PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

Or

How We Became Lost and How to Find Ourselves Again. – Bill Dean

Experience a young child (even if you merely observe) and you will notice that joy, that spontaneity, that totality of being in the present. Of course they do not always express happiness, but even their moments of despair will turn into joyful laughter moments later. All children, if given love and nurturing will demonstrate this. Yet almost all adults have lost the ability to live in this state. Some will justify it by claiming that adults cannot afford to be childish – they have responsibilities and it would be irresponsible to do so. And yet in all my working with people over the last 40+ years the vast majority will admit to wanting to find a way to live that expression of joy. It comes out as: I want to be authentic; I want to be me; I want to love and be loved.

So what happened?

We began to experience PAIN AND PUNISHMENT! Whether from our parents, siblings, other relatives, teachers, religion, or just the world itself, we began to experience pain – mostly in the form of punishment for not being the way we were supposed to be (or being too spontaneous). This turned into beliefs about ourselves that took on the form of “I am not enough – I am not good enough, smart enough, pretty enough.” Or perhaps “I am not worthy, I am stupid, or I am a failure”, etc. We began to believe these lies about ourselves. And then we began to learn how to SURVIVE.

We began to figure out ways to avoid pain and to become acceptable to those from whom we wanted love. As we grew up, those methods of avoiding pain were made part of our subconscious programming so that survival became the driving force of our lives. These survival mechanisms can be simplified into these categories:

  • Be in CONTROL.  Either through suppressing our feelings or suppressing other’s feelings (Don’t cry or stop crying, or stop laughing or do this, don’t do that and so on). We try to control others through anger, manipulation, intimidation, etc.
  • Be RIGHT. Make others wrong; collect evidence to support your rightness and/or another’s wrongness; gather allies to get support about how right you are or how wrong another is.
  • Save FACE. Always look good – no matter what. And make sure you do not cause another to lose face.

When survival becomes the driving force that runs our lives, we cannot be authentic nor can we truly love or be loved. We end up trying to be the way someone else wants us to be and we lose ourselves in that struggle.

Then we end up just drifting through life. Waiting for someone to approve of me. Waiting to survive the next disappointment or the next hurtful encounter. Seeking to blame others or myself for how my life turned out. Worried about the future or regretting the past while ignoring the present. Essentially being locked in a prison of our own making.

WHAT CAN BE DONE? WHAT IS THE WAY OUT OF THIS PRISON?

There is a way out; there is a path back to being who we truly are. Here are some steps:

  1. Decide you want it. In other words make a CHOICE to become who you truly are and be very CLEAR about that choice.
  2. Be COMMITTED. Not just committed when it is comfortable or convenient; but committed at a level of NO MATTER WHAT. Let no one or anything get in your way from that commitment.
  3. Take RISKS. Be vulnerable, be open to new ideas, keep on learning, share your true feelings, practice being uncomfortable.
  4. LET GO OF THE OLD. The old things that you keep to survive and stay safe but don’t really work (and never really have).
  5. WORK. Change can be hard and perhaps scary, so discipline yourself to constantly do this work. Never stop working.

FINALLY, seek out assistance. You do not have to do this by yourself. Find teachers who can guide you on this pathway to joy.

Whenever a student is willing, a teacher always appears.

“WE ARE ALWAYS GIVEN THE OPPORTUNITY TO SEEK THE PATH OF TRUE ENLIGHTENMENT, THE PATH OF LIVING AND LEARNING THROUGH JOY AND BEING THE LOVE WE WANT FROM OTHERS, THEN SHARING THAT LOVE.”

Thanks so much Bill for sharing your wisdom and insights with our Source Point Training community!

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

 

Launch Your Coaching Business by February!

Start training today for your career as a

Professional Performance Coach

and

Have paying clients by February!

In Fundamentals of Performance Coaching, you will learn:

  • How to establish a coaching relationship with others
  • The language of coaching and how to open possibilities for people to take action in achieving their goals
  • To use personality assessment tools to assist clients in understanding their thinking and behavior preferences
  • Templates and tools to use as a professional coach to guide people and manage their progress
  • Communication skills like Neuro Linguistics Programing that will empower people to think and behave in more resourceful ways

Create a life you love while coaching others to do the same!

In just 6 short months, you will:

  • Receive training on all of the ICF-based core competencies of coaching
  • Earn 90.5 ICF CCE’s which meets eligibility requirements for both ICF Membership and ACC Credentialing
  • Enroll paying clients to launch your coaching business or work as an internal corporate coach

Training Dates:

  • Module 1:  August 16-18, 2017
  • Module 2:  October 18-20, 2017
  • Module 3:  February 14-16, 2018

 

Call us TODAY to learn more and start your journey!

Your clients are waiting for YOU!!

Contact:

Name:   Ginny Carter, ACC
Title:      Administrative Director
Phone:  410-236-1491
Email address:  [email protected]

 

Coaching Today’s Workforce – Part 5 – Catching the College Grads with Coaching

Welcome to the third segment in our 5-part series on coaching trends and how to create a coaching culture in your organization.  If you missed Parts 1, 2 or 3 – you can access them here:  Part 1     Part 2     Part 3     Part 4

This series includes the philosophy and coaching experience of Barbara Fagan, President of Source Point Training, and a recent survey conducted by the International Coach Federation just released in October 2016.  We hope you enjoy these insights and applications on how you can include coaching as a way of contributing to people and teams within your organization.

 

CATCHING THE COLLEGE GRADS WITH COACHING!

What is the new generation of college graduates looking for when considering their first job out of college?  You might not have guessed it but mentoring, coaching and a plan for managing their careers rank in the top 5 areas of what today’s graduates look for.

May is typically graduation month for most colleges and this year more than ever there will be many new career opportunities for new grads in most fields from Engineering to technology to biochemical, just to name a few.  Many companies have already spent time at college campuses recruiting graduates for career opportunities.

According to a recent article published by Fortune magazine from authors Ed Frauenheim and Tabitha Russell, the companies that attract the most graduates also have the highest achievements in their field of business.  College students invest heavily in themselves and expect to have a return on that investment when they graduate.  Recruiting and retaining top talent and creating a powerful conversation about your company being a “great place to work” will yield rewards for many years into the future for both employees and employers.

Companies recognized as a great place to work enjoy a sense of team and community. Workers collaborate willingly and are not focused on politics, but more on being recognized for their contributions and guided by their mentors who take the time to give them real-time feedback.

This is why, for the last 7 years, Source Point Training has worked with organizations who are dedicated to providing coaching for their employees. Not the kind of coaching performance that in the past was seen as “fixing” a problem.  Today, progressive companies match a mentor who has coaching skills to new employees as part of their on-boarding process.  The mentor provides more self-direction in setting goals, knows how to give real-time feedback and encourages reaching out to colleagues for support.  These are what will attract the new generation of employees.

Source Point Training has over 30 years of professional coaching experience and today is working with companies who want to train managers to learn the skills of coaching and mentoring employees.  The feedback we receive consistently is that employees who receive coaching within their work environment – not just on issues at work but on how to manage time and priorities in their life more effectively:

  • achieve a higher sense of self-confidence
  • exhibit a willingness to take on new learning and reach new levels
  • become the most fulfilled employees and loyal advocates for their company as being one of the “best places to work”

As we wrap up the value of creating a coaching culture in organizations, we have shared that:

  • Today’s workforce wants their contribution to be seen and they want to be coached in areas where they can improve.
  • ICF surveys indicated that 82% of managers surveyed would like training on how to be effective coaches for their teams.
  • Performance coaching is now seen as an employee benefit for those who are seeking career advancement and the desire to increase their contribution.
  • Coaching is seen as one of the best ways to retain top talent, build loyalty and is an incentive for developing new capabilities.
  • Creating a trusting environment, where managers and colleagues conduct themselves ethically and actively listen to each other is valued more by most employees than the salary they are paid.
  • Potential employees can usually find comparable salaries but it is more difficult to find a corporate culture that fosters mentors and coaching people to achieve their career goals.
  • A coaching culture’s ROI is only as good as the competency of those using the coaching skills. Coaching employees effectively requires coach-specific skills and ongoing practice/usage of those skills.
  • According to the recent ICF/HCI survey Building a Coaching Culture with Managers and Leaders, “The training of managers/leaders using coaching skills is a very important part of building a coaching culture; 87% of respondents with strong coaching cultures report their current training has been instrumental in building a coaching culture.”
  • Organizations with a rich coaching culture report less employee turnover, increase in individuals achieving professional and personal  goals, changes in attitudes and behaviors leading to collaborative thinking and proactivity, reduction in expense – more efficient use of resources and time, increase in promotions and more leadership opportunities to expand business, and increase in market and customers.

If you want to change your corporate culture to include coaching, email Ginny Carter, Administrative Director, at [email protected].  We will discuss how you can provide your management team with the coaching core competencies recognized by the International Coach Federation (ICF) and the Association for Coaching (AC).

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

 

 

Coaching Today’s Workforce – Part 4

Welcome to the third segment in our 5-part series on coaching trends and how to create a coaching culture in your organization.  If you missed Parts 1, 2 or 3 – you can access them here: Part 1     Part 2     Part 3

This series includes the philosophy and coaching experience of Barbara Fagan, President of Source Point Training, and a recent survey conducted by the International Coach Federation just released in October 2016.  We hope you enjoy these insights and applications on how you can include coaching as a way of contributing to people and teams within your organization.

We are moving to the end of the first quarter 2017, and soon quarterly results will be published.  Companies’ strategic goals have been identified and project teams have been developed to take on key initiatives.  Soon, it will be time for annual reviews of performance and compensation plans.

While the investment in coaching is increasing in organizations, few businesses have a way to formally identify the success and return on investment.

What gets measured gets done. So what’s the best way to measure the impact of coaching?  Some outcomes that should be expected in a coaching culture include the following:

  • Competent leadership including effective communication, better cooperation, sharing resources, setting priorities and holding people responsible for their performance and results.  Coaching empowers people to take responsibility.
  • Less turnover and longer employee engagement. Turnover is a key indicator of the effectiveness of coaching in the workplace. When people are coached effectively and understand their roles and goals, they are more proactive and empowered.
  • Honest, open communication and use of effective feedback systems where everyone contributes to others through feedback – not just managers. People in a coaching culture know how to give effective feedback in a way that people can learn and make more effective choices going forward.  Feedback can “turn the lights on” so people can see and understand how to be more effective.
  • Improved service and responsiveness to all customers either internal or external.  Companies with a coaching culture see increased collaboration and problem solving across departments.

So, how do you measure these outcomes?  It is all in the numbers.  Organizations with a rich coaching culture show:

  • Less employee turnover
  • Individuals achieving professional and personal  goals
  • Changes in attitudes and behaviors leading to collaborative thinking and proactivity
  • Reduction in expense – more efficient use of resources and time
  • Increase in promotions and more leadership opportunities to expand business
  • Increase in market and customers

If you have invested in coach training, take time to determine how you are measuring the results of this investment.  All employees must understand the purpose of coaching and be introduced to ways of using coaching skills as a tool at all levels in the organization so that a true coaching culture exists.

Source Point Training offers organizations a full ICF Approved / AC Accredited coach-specific coach certification program as well as a curriculum for HR/L&D teams to then deliver independently within their organizations.

To learn more about this opportunity, please email Ginny Carter, Administrative Director, at [email protected].

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

 

Creating Meaningful Dialogue

Empowerment from Source Point Training | February 15, 2017

Rodney King, after the Los Angeles Riots in 1992 said, “Can’t we all get along”. Human beings are born to be connected; and yet we are living in a world today that seems to spend a good deal of time expressing all the ways that we are different in culture, age, life experiences and economic means.

The last decade in America has challenged us all to accept changes in ways that many had never expected.  With change comes resistance, always.  Change means that we must be willing to let go of the way that is, was or always has been.

My niece, who is a school principle, shared this video with me recently about a school in England that is teaching Oracy.  As I watched it, I thought how great it would be if all adults could take the time to go back and re-learn the art of meaningful dialogue.

How many times in the last year have you found yourself becoming frustrated or even fearful at what you hear people say around you?  Maybe at work you sense a lack of alignment or even competition in the way that people share their ideas.   How do you have meaningful dialogue with your co-workers?

In social situations with friends that you have known for years, do you find yourself checking out or even having judgments about what they are sharing? Sometimes, when we know people really well, we stop listening to them and assume we know what they think about things.  Or perhaps in the last year with the political climate you realized that you have very different beliefs about where we are headed as a country.  Maybe you find yourself becoming upset when you attempt to share your point of view and you’re interrupted by someone sharing their perspective.

As a group of people working together or those you socialize with, it is not uncommon to have this type of reaction to others.  This is why so many of us “protect” ourselves from other people’s judgments.  That’s why we play the game – “just go along” thinking it is easier to get along then rock the boat.

Organizations talk about collaboration and innovation to foster creativity but do most people really understand what is required to create the trust and willingness to share openly their ideas and opinions?

To have effective dialogue with others, we must first be willing to listen to understand.  Stephen Covey in his world-famous book “7 Habits of Highly Effective People” identified Seek First to Understand as one of the 7 habits for people to be most effective.  But what does that require?  We must be willing to suspend our judgments and opinions about what others are saying.  We must be open to listen to understand another’s point of view.   This requires us to let go of our worldview, which includes beliefs, values and assumptions many times.

Second, we must be willing to share our point of view even in the face of resistance. Be neutral, focus on finding ways to express what we believe in a way that others will be open to listen.  Look first at where we agree and connect and then bridge to another point of view we may have.  Know your “hot buttons.”  These are certain words or ideas that will trigger you into reaction.  We all have them.

Third, look for common ground where we have shared purpose and values.  Communicate clearly what you both agree on before discussing what you see differently or where you disagree.

Lastly, be respectful.  Our worldviews come from our past and how we were raised, our life’s experiences, core beliefs, values and circumstances.   We can’t change another person’s worldview just by giving them more information about what we think or the evidence we have. Worldviews are shaped over time.  Stephen Covey often spoke about shifting paradigms.  As our world changes and evolves over time, we can begin to see new possibilities if we respect different points of view and accept that our world is always changing.

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

 

Coaching Today’s Workforce – Part 3

Welcome to the third segment in our 5-part series on coaching trends and how to create a coaching culture in your organization.  If you missed Parts 1 and 2 – you can access them here:  Part 1     Part 2

This series includes the philosophy and coaching experience of Barbara Fagan, President of Source Point Training, and a recent survey conducted by the International Coach Federation just released in October 2016.  We hope you enjoy these insights and applications on how you can include coaching as a way of contributing to people and teams within your organization.

Creating a coaching culture where managers/leaders actively coach their teams can create positive change for both the organization and the employees; with the latter also having the added benefit of impacting both the personal and professional areas of their lives. Coaches understand that when you are coaching someone in one area – say improved time management – that there will also be improvements on time management at home. Or coaching an employee to have a difficult conversation with a co-worker through improved listing and communication skills will likewise benefit all of their relationships.

We also know that individuals and teams that perform at higher levels, more effectively and efficiently, translates to improved bottom line financial results. Research continues to provide evidence that coaching works and creating a coaching culture promotes attraction and attainment of top talent at all levels.

And . . . a coaching culture’s ROI is only as good as the competency of those using the coaching skills. Coaching employees effectively requires coach-specific skills and ongoing practice/usage of those skills. In his book, Journal of Change Management, A. M. Grant shares, “It takes between three and six months to become comfortable with using coaching skills in the workplace.” And of course, that’s with a solid training that sets managers up with the skills and a plan of action for those 3-6 months of practice and implementation.

According to the recent ICF/HCI survey Building a Coaching Culture with Managers and Leaders, “The training of managers/leaders using coaching skills is a very important part of building a coaching culture; 87% of respondents with strong coaching cultures report their current training has been instrumental in building a coaching culture.”

Most managers/leaders who receive coach-specific training do so through their HR/L&D Departments or through internal coach practitioners as reflected below.

This makes it critical that those in the HR/L&D Departments receive formal, accredited/ approved coach-specific training so that they are fully prepared to deliver a solid foundation of coach training to managers/leaders and provide ongoing support, mentoring, and follow up training. This is the foundation for developing and sustaining a strong coaching culture with an organization.

Source Point Training offers organizations a full ICF Approved / AC Accredited coach-specific coach certification program as well as a curriculum for HR/L&D teams to then deliver independently within their organizations.

To learn more about this opportunity, please give me a call today at 800-217-5660 ext. 101 or feel free to email me at [email protected].

Our best to you,

Barbara and everyone at Source Point Training

What a Year It Has Been!

As the year draws to a close, we at Source Point Training are celebrating our 7th Anniversary. Many said it wasn’t possible; but because of all of you, our passion for the work that we do, and our on-going commitment to make a difference in the world, we have been able to empower, educate and engage people and organizations these last 7 years.

The world continues to provide challenges for us all and with that comes the opportunity to learn, grow and adapt.  This year, SPT continued to support organizations that are committed to developing top leadership teams and learning to coach their teams to become self-generative and more fulfilled in the work they do. 

Lou, always passionate about traveling ANYWHERE in the world on a moments notice, continues to challenge people to break through their self limiting beliefs and embrace the unique and authentic human being they are and the contribution they make.  Barbara continues to work in Taipei, Hong Kong and now in Shanghai and Shenzhen developing professional coaches who are recognized by both the International Coach Federation and the Association for Coaching.  Barbara also became an Accredited Master Coach with the Association for Coaching!  Ginny continues to be the glue that hold Source Point Training together.  Anyone who has contact with us gets the opportunity to work with Ginny.  Through her commitment to being in service and her beyond belief operations skills, she keeps all the parts of Source Point Training moving forward.

And to all of the coaches who are a part of our professional coaching team around the world, we thank you so much for your partnership and your commitment to coaching and training the world over throughout these last 7 years.

Kelly Mobeck, who many of you have had the opportunity to work with as a coach sent her oldest son, Bradley, off to college this year. Brad has been a Source Point Training kid through the years and because of his mom’s great coaching, he could lead an outstanding team anywhere.  We know he will take these skills with him and wish him much success.

Helene Lynch, who has been one of our top Leadership Coaches, always throws a great Christmas party and this year most of the SPT team was there to celebrate with her. The stories were long and the laughter was belly aching!  We all love you, Helene!

This year we moved our Mastery of Performance Coaching training to Healdsburg so that the more mature coaching students could enjoy Barbara’s home town and some sightseeing and wine tasting – another great incentive to do your coach certification training with Source Point Training!

It is great when Barbara and Lou can find time to meet together – this year it was fortunate that they were both in Shanghai together and had the opportunity to have “fine dining” and time to catch up.

As we come to the end of 2016, we look back and reflect on how grateful we are to have the professional and personal relationships that we have shared with many of you. We wish you all the best in the year ahead – good health, peace and joy that make your heart sing!!!

Enjoy our video of highlights from 2016!

CLICK HERE – TURN YOUR SOUND ON!!

With warmest gratitude,

Happy New Year!!

Barbara, Lou and everyone at Source Point Training