Exploring Life – The Seasons Model

As a Capricorn, I have always felt connected to the earth – that being an earth sign.

This is why Blaine Bartlett’s Season’s Model of life is so compelling for me.  In this model, he shares that as humans we are always migrating through the sessions of life and that there is no “right” place to be.  In his book Three Dimensional Coaching, he talks about how this natural migration affects individuals, teams and organizations.   Since the beginning of time, humans have always been impacted by nature and weather, never more than now.  It is always a consistent topic of conversation.

As a coach, I work with clients to determine where they are in their life.  This model is excellent in helping people understanding what is occurring for them and perhaps why they are feeling the way they are feeling about different aspects of their life at different times.SeasonsModel600

The summer season in life is much like the season in nature.  There is a sense of confidence and movement; challenges we face are welcomed and excite us and we see ways to move forward, to build and accomplish our goals.  We have a sense of energy and courage to take risks and explore new arenas.  Just like nature, things grow and flourish with the richness of warm weather and longer days.

As autumn approaches, the days become cooler and shorter, plants begin to shrink back and prepare for the winter ahead.  As humans, the autumn of our life can mean the need to change directions in careers, or relationships.  In families, maybe the children are growing and leaving home changing the day-to-day dynamic. When we are experiencing autumn we know that changes are needed and we may have some anxiety about-facing them. Often, this is the time for people to seek coaching.

SeasonsChangesAhead300As autumn ends, we are then faced with the months of winter ahead.  People go inside, even with the holidays there tends to be more time for quiet reflection as people begin to plan their new year and think about how they want the next year to be.  Sometimes in winter we navigate a mini transition in our lives.

I have just come out of a winter phase where I had time to take an internal inventory to literally stop and examine my life, my purpose and vision and reflect and tap into my core values.  This was a time of healing and self-reflection for me and while it had its challenges, I learned to welcome it and surrender to the process.  While I have been home for the last few months, I have had the opportunity to slow down and really experience my life and my surroundings and to feel true gratitude for all that I have.

We have just come into spring; spring is about new beginnings and a time when we feel energized to experience life in so many ways.  Baseball season begins; we smell the fresh grass growing and the scent of new blossoms in our gardens.  We tend to evaluate our surroundings and determine what we want to refresh, in our homes, our careers, our clothing, etc.  It is a time when friends and acquaintances come out to get together after, in some cases, long days of in-climate weather and dark skies.  Many of us begin to have a sense of renewed purpose or a desire to set a new intention towards something we have been waiting to create.

As humans we can be in different seasons of life in different aspects of our life.  We may be approaching the autumn of our career and begin to shut down and move to winter to create the transition that will assist in designing a new identity for ourselves.  Or we may be younger and starting our first career job excited and challenged and ready to learn and grow so that if feels like summer.

To all of you, I invite you to first stop and enjoy the spring around you in nature as it is unfolding.  Ask yourselves what has opened up for you during the winter.  What are the new things you are excited to start doing?  Allow yourselves to feel alive and welcome the season as nature beautifully demonstrates for us all.  Stop and smell the roses.

Recommended read:  Three Dimensional Coaching: Moving Passion into Performance by Blaine Barlett

With warmest gratitude, Barbara Fagan